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Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility, a novel about the tribulations of two loving but very unalike sisters, ends on the happy note that “…though sisters, and living almost within sight of each other, they could live without disagreement between themselves, or producing coolness between their husbands.” Austen humorously addresses the reality of sisterhood—that any kind of sisterly accord or unity is not a foregone conclusion. For Devoney Looser, Professor of English and scholar of 18th-century women’s literature, the concept of “sisterhood” (figuratively and literally) in authorship is a complex exchange with positive and negative aspects. In fact, the “messiness” of women’s literary history is crucial to many aspects of her scholarship and teaching.

Published April 03, 2012

Soul and Body in the Quest for Human Flourishing

Soul and Body in the Quest for Human Flourishing

Brick Johnstone

Professor, Health Psychology

Published November 11, 2014

Bringing Music to Life

Bringing Music to Life

Leslie Perna

Associate Professor, School of Music

Published May 17, 2006

Between the Pistil and the Pollen

Between the Pistil and the Pollen

Bruce McClure

Professor, Biochemistry

Published January 25, 2010

SyndicateMizzou “Turns” 100

SyndicateMizzou “Turns” 100

SyndicateMizzou

a project of the Center for eResearch

Published May 15, 2013

SyndicateMizzou “Turns” 100

SyndicateMizzou “Turns” 100

SyndicateMizzou

a project of the Center for eResearch

Published May 15, 2013