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Articles Tagged with art

The Role of Nonprofits

An interview with Mirae Kim, Assistant Professor of Public Affairs

While Mirae Kim was a graduate student in Pittsburgh, a conversation with a friend clarified her future research interests. As Kim describes it, her friend said “My mom always makes a donation every year to the Carnegie Museum, though she rarely visits it.” When Kim asked why, her friend answered, “Well, she is a Pittsburgher, and she feels like it’s just ‘our thing.’” Kim realized, “So, as a community member, she feels like she is obliged to make some gift every year; it’s just something that she has to do. And I just got so fascinated: why do people make [these gifts]? Why do they feel they need to do that?” It was a practice she had not seen growing up in South Korea or studying abroad in New Zealand. In the United States, however—particularly Pittsburgh, a city known for charitable giving—Kim was intrigued by patrons making small donations—under $100—to arts organizations. Moreover, arts organizations’ share of revenue from individual donors was huge: “It wasn’t just a small amount,” Kim emphasizes, “but often fifty percent or more of their revenue stream.” She wanted to learn more: why do people make these gifts? What is the role of small gifts? What kind of contribution does the nonprofit sector make to the community?

The Work of a Public Sector Folklorist: Identifying, Documenting, and Promoting Missouri’s “Arts with a Genealogy”

An interview with Lisa Higgins, Director, Missouri Folk Arts Program

When we muse about “the arts,” it is often the fine arts that come to mind: famous plays, distinguished sculptures, celebrated paintings, and other aesthetic creations. However, art does not end at museum walls or with the last page of a book—art in many forms is present in ordinary life. For Dr. Lisa Higgins, witnessing the presence of traditional art in Missourians’ lives was an “empowering” experience that, together with her already “pervasive interest” in stories and storytelling, led her to undertake graduate work in folk studies at the University of Missouri. During the early nineties, she interned with the Missouri Folk Arts Program—a joint program of the Missouri Arts Council and MU’s Museum of Art & Archaeology—and gained first-hand experience with public folk art programs working to recognize and support Missouri artists. Working for the Southern Arts Federation (now South Arts) during the late nineties further piqued her interest in public support for the arts, and, with this experience under her belt, she returned in 1999 to her “dream job” as director of the Missouri Folk Arts Program and completed her PhD in Folklore and Rhetoric in 2008.

Picture Book Romance

An interview with Anne Rudloff Stanton, Associate Professor, Department of Art History and Archaeology

Anne Rudloff Stanton loves romance. She loves the way it looks, the way it sounds, and the way it smells—but only when it’s found in the margins of 14th-century books. The professor of Art History and Archaeology describes one example—a small drawing of a man leaving a woman—and she leans forward as if she were talking about a mutual friend of ours. “There’s this long sequence of the story of Moses, who, as you may not know, was married before he married Zipporah,” she begins. “He first married the daughter of the king of Ethiopia.”

Cultural Connections

An interview with Lampo Leong, Associate Professor, Art

Brush in hand, Lampo Leong carefully dips the pointed tip into a small pool of jet black ink. He quickly moves the ink-laden brush towards the dry rice-paper on the table, a thin, tan sheet held down at the edges by paperweights. A brief pause, and then Leong dashes the brush to the paper, the tip and side jumping and dancing across the sheet with intense, determined movements. As the brush reaches the end of the paper, Leong steps back, sets it down, and clasps his hands together. “This is cursive Chinese calligraphy,” he explains.

When Pottery Bolsters the Spirit

An interview with Bede Clarke, Professor of Art

“Ceramics is a very demanding discipline,” explains Bede Clarke, MU Professor of Art. Even after 35 years in the field, he says, “it still takes a lot out of me to do good work.” Clarke’s creative activity focuses on two areas. One involves the use of color and drawing and painting on clay with abstract and figurative imagery, and the other is wheel-thrown pottery fired in a wood kiln to achieve glaze effects.

If Antiquities Could Talk

An interview with Alex Barker, Director, Museum of Art and Archeology

Alex Barker wears several different hats in MU’s Department of Anthropology and the Museum of Art and Archaeology. One of these hats involves his research and fieldwork on the European Bronze Age and the ancient American southeast. The other involves the directorship of MU’s Museum of Art and Archaeology. Standing at the crossroads of several disciplinary fields, most of Barker’s field research has in recent years dealt with a single broad question: how social complexity grows out of egalitarian societies. His fieldwork in North America and the Old World follows this transition over different periods and regions.

“As Far as the Pi Can See”

An interview with Carmen Chicone, Professor of Mathematics

Great celestial bodies populate the solar system. For an untrained eye staring at the heavens, the starlight spectacles and endless seas of blackness are nothing short of a miracle. Researchers, however, have developed mathematical equations that may help us understand such mysteries of the universe. From Isaac Newton’s Law of Universal Gravitation to Albert Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity, the scientific community has paved the way for a greater understanding of the great beyond.

Generating Graphic Designs

An interview with Deborah Huelsbergen, Associate Professor, Art Department

In an office immersed in brilliant lime green and blue, Deborah Huelsbergen sits in front of her computer screen, with its Fruitloops screen saver, digging through boxes to pull out examples of her artwork. An associate professor of art and graphic design at Mizzou, Huelsbergen highlights two recent projects--both illustrated children’s books.

Audio and Video Tagged with art

Shifting Priorities for Community Engagement

From an interview with Mirae Kim, Assistant Professor of Public Affairs

Dr. Kim traces the shift in focus for arts organizations from education to broader definitions of community engagement.

The Role of Nonprofits

From an interview with Mirae Kim, Assistant Professor of Public Affairs

Dr. Kim relates how she became interested in studying nonprofit arts organizations, and describes the different ways the nonprofit sector and nonprofit organizations function in the United States.

Arts Organizations and Civic Engagement

From an interview with Mirae Kim, Assistant Professor of Public Affairs

Dr. Kim describes the interest in the arts field about civic engagement, and discusses her research on arts organizations and community engagement.

Dr. Higgins’ Biography

From an interview with Lisa Higgins, Director, Missouri Folk Arts Program

Dr. Higgins discusses her background in folklore studies and how she came to be director of the Missouri Folk Arts Program.

Teaching and Research

From an interview with SyndicateMizzou, a project of the Center for eResearch

Past interviewees describe the intersection of their teaching and research.

Teaching and Workshops

From an interview with Jo Stealey, Professor of Art

Stealey discusses the interdependence of her creative thinking and teaching.

Tea Pot Vessel

From an interview with Jo Stealey, Professor of Art

Stealey shows off some of her vibrant and pleasantly strange teapots sculptures.

Creative Family

From an interview with Jo Stealey, Professor of Art

Stealey shares the influence her supportive family had on her creativity and the unique ways in which their talents precluded her own.

Book Sculptures

From an interview with Jo Stealey, Professor of Art

Stealey explains the purpose of interactive art, as exemplified by sculptural books.

A Process of Dialogues

From an interview with Jo Stealey, Professor of Art

Dr. Stealey discusses the vitality of unexpectedness and surprise to her creative process, and the benefit of indulging multiple projects at once.

“Lampo Leong Day”

From an interview with Lampo Leong, Associate Professor, Art

While teaching in San Francisco, Lampo Leong received a commission to create a huge granite inset medallion (26 feet in diameter) for a public park. During the opening celebrations, “Lampo Leong Day” was declared by the Mayor, a day in November commemorating the work the artist has done for the city. “I am really grateful and honored to have had a day dedicated to me,” says Leong.

Multimedia Art

From an interview with Lampo Leong, Associate Professor, Art

Another way that Leong has dealt with mixed media is through his work Spiritual Transformations, a collaborative art form that combines animated video of his painted images with contemporary music. He creates the artwork, while MU professor Thomas McKenney composes the music by using software that generates sounds from images.

Public Art in San Francisco

Digital Film

Combination of Visual Art and Performance Art

From an interview with Lampo Leong, Associate Professor, Art

Lampo Leong describes the creative process of cursive Chinese calligraphy as “very similar to a dance or a musical performance.” He explains that “the success of marking on paper is, to a certain extent, a direct reflection of the quality of the performance while creating the piece.”

Wild Cursive Calligraphy

Mixed-Media Painting

From an interview with Lampo Leong, Associate Professor, Art

Inspired by the post-modern art movement, Leong combines different art forms and concepts from Chinese and Western art with digital technology in order to create his mixed-media paintings. He sees this multifaceted process as expressing the spirit of “the sublime and grandeur at a time of globalization.”

Visual Samples

Through the Eyes of the Viewer

From an interview with Lampo Leong, Associate Professor, Art

Leong has noticed a heightened interest in Chinese calligraphy in the Western world, and his work is now sought out for exhibitions and commissions as well as collected by many museums. He believes that this increased attention derives from the unique visual experience that calligraphy provides: “The viewer becomes involved while looking at the piece as if he/she is watching the brush dance across the stage—its movements, its rhythm… [like] viewing a dance performance and a painting at the same time.”

Reviews of Leong’s Work

Classical Chinese Tools

From an interview with Lampo Leong, Associate Professor, Art

As the brush glides across the rice-paper, it seems to “actually dance on paper,” according to Leong. The artist is allowed greater manipulation with the Chinese brush because of its pointed and soft bristles, as opposed to the flat, stiff bristles of the Western brush. Energetic black strokes and the strong contrast provided by the black ink are some of the characteristics that distinguish Chinese calligraphy.

Chinese Brush Making

History behind the Art of Chinese Calligraphy

From an interview with Lampo Leong, Associate Professor, Art

“Wild cursive calligraphy” is a millennia-old Chinese art form. “It is not a written language for the general public to write every day,” Leong notes, “but rather an expressive art form used by the artist.”

Brief History

Mixed-Media Installation: Suspended Marks

From an interview with Lampo Leong, Associate Professor, Art

Not only does Leong create mixed-media paintings; he also assembles multimedia installations, such as calligraphy on translucent silk scrolls suspended in a space. He illuminates these suspended artworks with colored lights and video projections in order to create a three-dimensional illusion for viewers to walk through and experience on multiple levels.

Images of Installation

“Never set out to do mediocre work”

From an interview with Bede Clarke, Professor of Art

In all his years of making ceramics, Clarke declares, he never set out to do mediocre work. Creative work, he believes, “is what drives the artist to despair and to exhilaration.” Clarke recalls that while apprenticing with Karl Christiansen, the master instilled in him the idea that one never really arrives as an artist: “you’ll never get to the point where you do everything correctly and there is no more to learn, no more to grow.” Learning to make good pots requires nothing short of a lifetime of practice. “There is always more you don’t know,” Clarke adds. “There is always, hopefully, better work to come.”

Teaching Ceramics

From an interview with Bede Clarke, Professor of Art

Bede Clarke has been teaching in MU’s Art Department since 1992, with classes ranging from beginning to graduate ceramics. Beginning ceramics classes are very design-oriented, Clarke explains, “geared toward instilling good design principles and decision-making in students.” Besides sitting behind the potter’s wheel, his students do background research on some aspects of ceramic history—“about 20,000 years of human beings making things out of clay”—a learning process that may involve a trip to the Museum of Art and Archeology as well as to Ellis Library.

“Throwing” on the Potter’s Wheel

From an interview with Bede Clarke, Professor of Art

While he also works with drawing and painting, ceramics is Clarke’s major creative area. “Ceramics is a very demanding discipline,” he says. “After 35 years, I still find it challenging, so I tend to focus on it – maybe because I find that I need to, to do something that’s any good at all. It still takes a lot out of me to do good work.” His creative activity tends to focus on two areas. One involves drawing and painting on clay with abstract and figurative imagery, and the other is wheel-thrown pottery fired in a wood kiln to achieve the desired glaze effects. Clarke moves behind the potter’s wheel to offer a demonstration on the art of throwing a pot.

From Inspiration to Evaluation

From an interview with Bede Clarke, Professor of Art

Although their medium is visual, ceramics students are encouraged to articulate their experiences verbally, as well as to write about them. A fundamental part of these classes involves critique, where students present their finished products to the class, talk about their inspiration and ideas, and critically evaluate the work in terms of where it has succeeded and where it has failed. Beyond creation and evaluation, students research a topic (e.g., a culture’s ceramics or a contemporary ceramic artist) and present their findings to the class. “It’s probably my favorite part of the class,” Clarke remarks, “because they become the teachers."

Adding Embellishments

From an interview with Bede Clarke, Professor of Art

Once the pot has been thrown, the potter must make decisions while the clay is still wet about handles, trim, texture, or other decorations—details that can add a lot to a piece. If it is kept wrapped in plastic, the artist might have a week or two to finish it. Clarke takes a moment to consider the pot he has just finished throwing and decides that—were he to continue working on it—he would want to alter or embellish it in some way. Clarke has observed that it takes students about 12 weeks of concentrated work to get these basics. “It’s a skill, but it’s more,” Clarke explains. When he asks students how they feel when they are really “getting it,” they report that they feel “connected” to the clay.

“Pottery keeps me honest”

From an interview with Bede Clarke, Professor of Art

Clarke describes how the creative work of making pots necessarily involves research. He has observed that visual artists have a close relationship to the raw materials with which they work. As an artist, Clarke explains that “pottery keeps me honest. Pottery is a very simple art form. It is very demanding in terms of detail, line, shape, and form. Maybe because it’s so simple and unassuming, it makes me focus on what I’m trying to communicate, rather than chasing the latest fad that’s going on.”

“Good pots bolster the spirit”

From an interview with Bede Clarke, Professor of Art

The important thing, suggests Clarke, is not the particular artistic genre in which one works — whether still-life painting, landscape painting, making pots, or figurative sculpture — but what the artist has to say. As he explains, “I’m interested in reaching out, as the maker of these things, to other people. The things I create are made to live their lives in people’s homes. I envision them being things people would have in their homes, the way they have their favorite radio station on, or books on their shelves that they like to pull down. I’m aware that I have the potential to contribute something to their daily life. I aspire for it to be something deeply human and compassionate and worthwhile.”

Where to Get Good Clay

From an interview with Bede Clarke, Professor of Art

“There is great clay right here in Missouri,” says Clarke. In fact, some of the richest deposits are within forty miles of Columbia. But to prepare clay like this, “it is kind of like baking,” he explains, in that you must add a variety of different ingredients—in this case, clays, colorants, and fluxes—to create a clay body. Depending on the ingredients, the clay can be given desired characteristics, for instance filler material like sand or grog can be added to give the clay “tooth and strength.” These materials are combined in different ratios, depending upon how the artist wants the clay to behave: “If you are building a large-scale, thick sculpture, you would choose a very different clay from that used to make very delicate translucent porcelain. An understanding of clay is pretty fundamental."

Romanian Surrealist Artist, Victor Brauner

From an interview with Alex Barker, Director, Museum of Art and Archeology

One of the paintings Barker was pleasantly surprised to find in the museum’s collection is a self-portrait by the Romanian surrealist Victor Brauner. Dating from 1923, the painting reflects the period immediately before the artist moved fully into surrealism as a means of representation. “It is a remarkable portrait,” explains Barker, “because it is the last time he paints himself with both eyes.” In his subsequent work, that is, the artist always paints himself with one eye missing—whether there is a gaping wound, an automaton of some kind, or his eyes placed on his hands. In 1938, Brauner was in a bar fight, during which his eye was poked out—the very eye he had been painting himself without for a decade and a half. Barker says, “Surrealism holds it up as an example of sort of a premonitory knowledge that this was going to happen, proof that time is not linear to the unconscious mind.”

More than the Object’s Label

From an interview with Alex Barker, Director, Museum of Art and Archeology

Barker refers to a certain tension between curators, who have all this ‘stuff’ they want to communicate, and exhibit designers, who want to keep the exhibit as clean and simple as possible. “Ultimately, we want people looking at the art, not at the labels,” he indicates; but the Museum still wants to educate. In that spirit, the museum is experimenting with technology to showcase the art and the significance of art to everyone by creating MP3-based audio tours of the museum that can then be played on any personal audio device, including iPods, notebook computers, and even cell phones. Barker hopes this will allow greater flexibility for visitors, whom he imagines selecting a tour and walking through the galleries at their leisure while looking at the art and listening to the audio information, “instead of looking back and forth between the label and the art.”

The Museum of Art and Archaeology

From an interview with Alex Barker, Director, Museum of Art and Archeology

Barker has worked in several kinds of museums—natural history museums and anthropology museums. “No one feels uncomfortable going into a natural history museum without knowing about bird taxonomy or going into an anthropology museum without knowing the latest details about the origins of humans,” he says. “But a lot of people are uncomfortable coming to an art museum if they don’t know a lot about art, and that is not a good thing.” Fortunately, the Museum of Art and Archaeology combines art with classical archaeology, offering a view of the changes of art over a very long period of time. Barker has been trying to make people more comfortable with the idea of coming into the museum and having their own experience with art—engaging authentic objects, whether from antiquity or from more recent periods, on their own terms.

From Numbers to Woodworking

From an interview with Carmen Chicone, Professor of Mathematics

Beyond his passion for mathematics, Chicone’s favorite pastime is building furniture. He finds it amusing that people try to find a connection between his interests, and insists that woodworking is a love completely outside of math.

Math: A Symposium of Art

From an interview with Carmen Chicone, Professor of Mathematics

Chicone believes math is an artistic expression like music, painting, and theatre. Not everyone can identify with this art, he admits, but those who can are able to develop a strong appreciation for problem-solving.

On Teaching the Creative Process

From an interview with Deborah Huelsbergen, Associate Professor, Art Department

Huelsbergen discusses how she encourages students to take risks with their designs.

Design Philosophy 1

From an interview with Deborah Huelsbergen, Associate Professor, Art Department

Huelsbergen discusses her service philosophy as a graphic designer.

Design Philosophy 2

From an interview with Deborah Huelsbergen, Associate Professor, Art Department

Continued from above.

On Fostering Trust in the Classroom

From an interview with Deborah Huelsbergen, Associate Professor, Art Department

Huelsbergen talks about fostering trust in the classroom.

More Examples

From an interview with Deborah Huelsbergen, Associate Professor, Art Department

Continued from above.

Illustration Examples III

From an interview with Deborah Huelsbergen, Associate Professor, Art Department

Continued from above.

On Graphic Design

From an interview with Deborah Huelsbergen, Associate Professor, Art Department

Huelsbergen talks about graphic design versus the manual arts.

Illustration Examples I

From an interview with Deborah Huelsbergen, Associate Professor, Art Department

Huelsbergen shows examples of her recent artwork.

Illustration Examples II

From an interview with Deborah Huelsbergen, Associate Professor, Art Department

Continued from above.

Costume design

From an interview with Jim Miller, Professor of Theatre

Miller shows some of his original costume renderings.

Beginnings

From an interview with Jim Miller, Professor of Theatre

Miller discusses his journey through New York, commercial advertising, and art school—ulimately leading to his position in the Department of Theatre here at Mizzou.

A passion for all the arts

From an interview with Jim Miller, Professor of Theatre

Miller discusses some of his original works in costume design, painting and music composition.