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Articles Tagged with brain

Alcohol and Racial Bias

An interview with Bruce Bartholow, Associate Professor, Department of Psychological Sciences

Ask Bruce Bartholow about his current research projects, and the associate professor of psychology at MU will likely direct your attention to the large whiteboard mounted on his office wall. Crowded with names of collaborators and topics ranging from alcohol and race bias to video games and aggression, this board reveals the breadth of Bartholow’s research.

This is Your Brain on Camera

An interview with Shawn Christ, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychological Sciences

A rainbow of feathers floats upward like a psychedelic butterfly. Fingers of color, violet and lime green, seem to flow outward from the tips of the wings. If you didn’t know better, you might assume it is a work of art. Beyond their beauty, for Shawn Christ these images taken at MU’s new Brain Imaging Center reveal the brain’s activity and connections. In his role as Assistant Professor of Psychology and Director of MU’s Clinical Neuropsychology Laboratory, Christ studies how the relationship between the brain and behavior changes as we develop. Christ chose a career in psychology because it would combine two passions— working with kids and solving puzzles.

Zealous Mercenaries

An interview with Habib Zaghouani , Professor, Department of Immunology and Microbiology

In a back corner of the University of Missouri’s medical building, a few floors above the hospital and tucked away to the right, Habib Zaghouani watches a cellular war. He has been up there for seven years, with an army of graduate students and a colony of mice, trying to understand why our bodies attack us and how we can make them stop.

Begging the Bigger Questions

An interview with Carol Ward, Associate Professor, Department of Pathology and Anatomical Sciences

We see that as humans we are different from other modern primates, although we don't know exactly how that came to be. Unlocking this mystery has been Anthropology professor Carol Ward's life's work. While the fossil record is sketchy at times, it is crucial in estimating the chronology of certain key acquisitions of modern humans, be it walking on two feet, developing big brains, changing their diet, or changing their tool-making behavior. Working with fossils, Ward seeks to answer the bigger question—why did those changes occur?

Audio and Video Tagged with brain

Research Applicability

From an interview with Bruce Bartholow, Associate Professor, Department of Psychological Sciences

Bartholow explains that his research extends beyond an exploration of alcohol and its effects on social behaviors: it tells us about how the brain works.

Alcohol and Emotion

From an interview with Bruce Bartholow, Associate Professor, Department of Psychological Sciences

The project on alcohol and race bias led Bartholow to explore the question of why alcohol reduces the brain’s response to errors. He found that alcohol reduces negative affect, increasing the subjects’ positive feelings and thus causing them to care less about their classification errors.

“Fighting Our Own Biology”: Evolutionary Eating Habits

From an interview with Matt Will, Assistant Professor of Psychological Sciences

Will describes a recent project exploring the relationship between binge-eating and increased food palatability. Genetics plays a large role in our craving for high-calorie food.

Picturing Task Sets

From an interview with Shawn Christ, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychological Sciences

The majority of Christ’s work focuses on the brain’s inferior frontal gyrus. That’s the part of the brain involved in most higher-level abilities: working memory, strategy use, inhibitory control, and especially keeping track of the to-do list for any sort of task.

Combining Structure and Function

From an interview with Shawn Christ, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychological Sciences

Christ uses a lot of technology, including an eye tracker, projections, and functional and structural MRIs, to figure out why the brain works the way it does. All of these tools have their advantages and disadvantages.

The Potential to Reverse Multiple Sclerosis

From an interview with Habib Zaghouani , Professor, Department of Immunology and Microbiology

Zaghouani’s third project has had great success. Cara Haymaker, who is in charge of this research program, reports that they have identified a successful treatment for experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, a disease affecting mice that is very similar to multiple sclerosis in humans. So far, the research team has been able to completely reverse the disease in mice with two forms of treatment.

Introduction to Research

From an interview with John Kerns, Assistant Professor, Psychology

Kerns gives an introduction to his research on cognitive processes and the brain.

Brain Regions

From an interview with John Kerns, Assistant Professor, Psychology

Kerns discusses activity in various brain regions as a result of different cognitive process.

Brain Imaging - Viewing Your Cognitive Activity

From an interview with John Kerns, Assistant Professor, Psychology

Kerns discusses the technology used in his research to view brain activity.

Introduction to Research (continued)

From an interview with John Kerns, Assistant Professor, Psychology

Kerns continues to give an overview of his research.

Cognitive Control (continued)

From an interview with John Kerns, Assistant Professor, Psychology

Kerns discusses more on cognitive control.

FMRI in Psychology Resesarch: Viewing Brain Activity

From an interview with John Kerns, Assistant Professor, Psychology

Kerns discusses how brain activity is viewed during an FMRI scan.

FMRI in Psychology Resesarch: History

From an interview with John Kerns, Assistant Professor, Psychology

Kerns discusses how FMRI technologies started to be used in psychology research.

Stages of Schizophrenia

From an interview with John Kerns, Assistant Professor, Psychology

Kerns discusses the characteristics of the different stages of schizophrenia.

Cognitive Control

From an interview with John Kerns, Assistant Professor, Psychology

How cognitive control processes work. What scholars know about the human brain.

Analyzing Cognition in the Lab

From an interview with John Kerns, Assistant Professor, Psychology

Kerns discusses how activity in different parts of brain can be observed in the lab.

Cognitive Control (continued)

From an interview with John Kerns, Assistant Professor, Psychology

How cognitive control processes work. What scholars know about the human brain.

FMRI in Psychology Resesarch

From an interview with John Kerns, Assistant Professor, Psychology

Kerns discusses the use of FMRI in his research.

FMRI in Psychology Resesarch: How it Works

From an interview with John Kerns, Assistant Professor, Psychology

Kerns discusses the process a person goes through to have the cognitive activities imaged.

Evolution of Intelligence

From an interview with Carol Ward, Associate Professor, Department of Pathology and Anatomical Sciences

Collaborating with Mark Flinn (psychology and anthropology) and David Geary (psychology) on how and why human brains developed as they did.