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Articles Tagged with database

Reconstructing the History of Earthquakes, Mountains, and Volcanoes

An interview with Mian Liu, Professor of Geological Sciences

Becoming a geologist was not the original aspiration for Mian Liu, Professor of Geological Sciences. The Chinese government assigned him to the discipline when he was 17 years old, a course of study he later followed at Nanjing University. His initial lack of interest in geology had much to do with the way the subject was taught. “The focus was not on understanding the processes; we were forced to memorize lots of facts,” he explains. Instead, Liu’s earliest interest was in physics, which “just seemed more intuitive.” He began sitting in on a variety of lectures and found that he preferred learning about geophysics, the physics of the Earth, eventually earning a Ph.D. in that area from the University of Arizona.

Mapping the Cultural Landscape

An interview with Soren Larsen, Assistant Professor, Geography

Going far beyond maps, as one might presume, “Geography is the study of human-environment interactions,” explains Soren Larsen, Assistant Professor of Geography at MU. The discipline as a whole covers activity ranging from physical geography (e.g., wind erosion and weather patterns), techniques (e.g., modeling air pollution with GIS, or Geographic Information Systems, to understand the interactions between humans and the environment), and something called human geography, a subfield that focuses on the political, economic, cultural, urban, and regional elements of human-environment interactions. Human geographers cast their eyes on “the impact of the environment on human behavior,” as well as “the impact of human activity on the environment.” Within human geography Larsen specializes in cultural geography. While traditionally that may have entailed mapping the distribution of various cultural traits to track changes over space and time, cultural geography today is much more process-focused, drawing heavily upon the methodologies and theories of anthropology, psychology, sociology, and philosophy.

"Googling" for Biomedical and Geospatial Informatics

An interview with Chi-Ren Shyu, Assistant Professor, Computer Science and Computer Engineering

With all the different projects Professor Chi-Ren Shyu has on his proverbial plate, it's hard to imagine he has any time to sleep. Yet with easy finesse and exuberance, Shyu describes just a few of his ongoing "joyful and rewarding" research initiatives, ranging from biomedical and geospatial informatics to computer imaging of medical images. Not surprisingly, Shyu has gained a well-earned reputation for his collaborative work. Although diverse, what these research interests share is the effort to create large-scale, fast, and multidimensional databases.

Audio and Video Tagged with database

Changing the way geoscientists store data

From an interview with Mian Liu, Professor of Geological Sciences

As if Liu’s “plate” isn’t full enough, he also has his hand in a research project called GEON (Geoscience Network) supported by the National Science Foundation. This initiative involves a dozen institutions along with the San Diego Supercomputer Center. The goal is to create a prototype of geosciences cyberinfrastructure, so “that any scientist can have any kind of data at his or her fingertips.”

Gathering data

From an interview with Soren Larsen, Assistant Professor, Geography

Larsen gathers his data through a variety of different methods ranging from ethnographic field research to content analysis and GIS. But the method he prefers is called “participant observation,” an approach in which “you go and live with the people for an extended period of time, so you can start to learn how they think and feel and act.” In fact, Larsen considers participant observation to be a base line for all the research he does because “you gain an insight by participating in the culture.”

GeoIris Demo II

From an interview with Chi-Ren Shyu, Assistant Professor, Computer Science and Computer Engineering

Demonstration by doctoral student Matt Klaric of how the GeoI system works.

Searching Visual Phenotypes in Plants

From an interview with Chi-Ren Shyu, Assistant Professor, Computer Science and Computer Engineering

“Googling” for visual phenotypes in plants to examine for mutations or disease.

"Googling" for Geospatial Imagery

From an interview with Chi-Ren Shyu, Assistant Professor, Computer Science and Computer Engineering

GeoIris: a project supported by the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency.

Protein Database Demonstration

From an interview with Chi-Ren Shyu, Assistant Professor, Computer Science and Computer Engineering

Demonstration by Shyu of the protein database.

GeoIris Demo I

From an interview with Chi-Ren Shyu, Assistant Professor, Computer Science and Computer Engineering

Demonstration by doctoral student Matt Klaric of how the GeoIris system works.

"Googling" for 3-D Protein Structures

From an interview with Chi-Ren Shyu, Assistant Professor, Computer Science and Computer Engineering

The new database that offers real time, high-accuracy searches for researchers.