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Articles Tagged with law school

Collateral Consequences

An interview with S. David Mitchell, Associate Professor, School of Law

When S. David Mitchell leaves for work in the morning, he isn’t sure which hat to wear. Sometimes he is a law professor, and sometimes he is a sociologist. On most days he wears both hats at once—an interdisciplinary approach to research that seems to bode well. As an associate professor in MU’s School of Law, Mitchell’s teaching and research feed off each other, focusing on the intersection of society and the law. While his teaching covers topics ranging from torts and criminal justice administration—from “bail to jail”—the courses he gets most excited about involve his main area of research, including “Law and Society” and “Collateral Consequences of Sentencing.”

Audio and Video Tagged with law school

The Writing Connection

From an interview with S. I. Strong, Manley O. Hudson Professor of Law; Senior Fellow, Center for the Study of Dispute Resolution

“Being a good writer,” Dr. Strong argues, “is a critical part of being an attorney.” In this segment, she discusses why this is the case, and how law students can and should develop their research and writing skills to become better lawyers.

From Writing to Law: Education and Career

From an interview with S. I. Strong, Manley O. Hudson Professor of Law; Senior Fellow, Center for the Study of Dispute Resolution

Dr. Strong relates how her interests shifted from literature to law, and describes her education and early career.

The Practice of Law and the Teaching of Law

From an interview with S. I. Strong, Manley O. Hudson Professor of Law; Senior Fellow, Center for the Study of Dispute Resolution

Dr. Strong shares how her considerable experience of litigating very complex cases enhances her teaching, and how a professor’s background in the practice of law benefits students.

Courses Taught at MU

From an interview with S. David Mitchell, Associate Professor, School of Law

Mitchell teaches a broad range of courses, including a criminal justice administration course that he describes as “bail to jail”; a class about torts, which involve civil wrongs; and one called Law and Society, which examines the social context behind the law. The latter course clearly reflects Mitchell’s background in sociology, which has influenced both his pedagogy and his research. In Collateral Consequences of Sentencing, he covers felon disenfranchisement, felon exclusion laws, and prisoner reentry.