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Articles Tagged with microchip

At First Sight

An interview with Kristina Narfström, Professor, Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery

Imagine waking to a bright, sunny day, but not really being able to see. Some people go their whole lives without witnessing that vivid red ball from their youth or the facial features of a loved one. Kristina Narfström, a veterinary ophthalmologist at the University of Missouri, is doing research that promises to provide some light at the end of the tunnel.

Audio and Video Tagged with microchip

Using Gene Transfer to Replace Dead Photoreceptors

From an interview with Kristina Narfström, Professor, Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery

Genetic transfer can be used to replace dead photoreceptor cells. Narfström employs this method to correct protein defects in the eyes. The procedure involves injecting a construct – a vehicle that brings the protein the correct DNA – into the retina cell. The construct is then transported into the nucleus, where it is translated to make the correct protein.

Using a Microchip to Replace Dead Photoreceptors

From an interview with Kristina Narfström, Professor, Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery

Another treatment involves inserting a small microchip to replace the dead photoreceptors and get the electrical juices of the eye flowing. This device, known as an Artificial Silicon Retina (ASR), is conceptually similar to a bionic eye. The ASR was designed more than 15 years ago to enhance human vision. Narfström hopes that her research will improve the chip.