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Articles Tagged with obsidian

The Parts of the Sum

An interview with Michael Glascock, Senior Research Scientist and Research Assistant Prof of Nuclear Engineering, Research Reactor

Dr. Michael Glascock defines archaeometry as the combination of several scientific practices—“chemistry, physics, biology, engineering, statistics, etc.”—used to analyze manmade and natural artifacts. Dr. Glascock is a research professor with the Archeometry Lab at the MU Research Reactor, where he tracks trade routes and preferred materials of ancient peoples. He has lectured around the world and promotes the philosophy he applies to his work here: archaeometry is, by definition, a cooperative field, and Glascock believes in the collaborative process. He says, “It’s really the team of archaeologists plus physicists and chemists getting together—they can produce a really good product.” His hope is that this successful approach can lend itself to other labs.

If Antiquities Could Talk

An interview with Alex Barker, Director, Museum of Art and Archeology

Alex Barker wears several different hats in MU’s Department of Anthropology and the Museum of Art and Archaeology. One of these hats involves his research and fieldwork on the European Bronze Age and the ancient American southeast. The other involves the directorship of MU’s Museum of Art and Archaeology. Standing at the crossroads of several disciplinary fields, most of Barker’s field research has in recent years dealt with a single broad question: how social complexity grows out of egalitarian societies. His fieldwork in North America and the Old World follows this transition over different periods and regions.

Audio and Video Tagged with obsidian

From Volcanoes to the Lab: Tracking Trade Routes

From an interview with Michael Glascock, Senior Research Scientist and Research Assistant Prof of Nuclear Engineering, Research Reactor

Glascock details a fundamental function of the archaeometry performed at MU: tracking. He highlights obsidian as a key material used for this task.

Collaborative Research

From an interview with Alex Barker, Director, Museum of Art and Archeology

“Collaboration is necessary for someone like me because I don’t have a field,” says Barker. “Am I an anthropological archaeologist or am I a museum director? I’m both. We often talk about interdisciplinary research; by necessity, mine is completely interdisciplinary. It is always sitting between and spanning multiple disciplines.” He collaborates, for example, with other museums and research centers, for example with Michael D. Glascock of the Missouri Reactor Center’s Archaeometry Laboratory.