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Articles Tagged with stereotypes

Who Will Tell Native Stories, and Who Will Hear Them

An interview with Joanna Hearne, Assistant Professor, English Department

Native Americans have long struggled for accurate representation in media, particularly in film. Whether the uncredited performances of the “documentary” Nanook of the North or the familiar racism of traditional Westerns, Indigenous cultures have rarely been given much truthful, let alone positive, attention. However, Native people have been slowly cultivating their own voice in film, and that voice is what Dr. Joanna Hearne has spent her academic career studying.

Alcohol and Racial Bias

An interview with Bruce Bartholow, Associate Professor, Department of Psychological Sciences

Ask Bruce Bartholow about his current research projects, and the associate professor of psychology at MU will likely direct your attention to the large whiteboard mounted on his office wall. Crowded with names of collaborators and topics ranging from alcohol and race bias to video games and aggression, this board reveals the breadth of Bartholow’s research.

Countering Media Stereotypes

An interview with Elizabeth Behm-Morawitz, Assistant Professor of Communication

Lara Croft in Lara Croft Tomb Raider: Legend is known as much, or more so, for her hyper-sexualized body as for her skills and adventures. This is often the norm for female characters in video games, saysElizabeth Behm-Morawitz, Assistant Professor of Communication at MU. Having recently finished her first year at MU, Behm-Morawitz actually began studying video games as a doctoral student at the University of Arizona. “Seeing these hyper-sexualized images of women caught my attention,” she recounts.

Behm-Morawitz’s research focuses on the effects video games can have on college students: “This is a stage of life when you’re on your own for the first time. You’re doing a lot of identity exploration, making sense of the world, coming into your own. So, this is a time when media images might have an impact on how you think about gender and how you think about yourself.”

Audio and Video Tagged with stereotypes

Sympathetic Westerns and the “Vanishing Indian” pt. 1

From an interview with Joanna Hearne, Assistant Professor, English Department

Native-sensitive film didn’t begin with Dances With Wolves, as Dr. Hearne explains. There is a long history of films that were sympathetic to the Native cause but still presented their own set of negative stereotypes about Native life.

Connecting Research and Teaching

From an interview with Bruce Bartholow, Associate Professor, Department of Psychological Sciences

Bartholow explains how his research and teaching intersect. In a senior-level course on research methods, for example, he discusses the procedures used in his own lab. Students are “integral to everything” in his working group.

How Women View Hyper-Sexualized Female Characters

From an interview with Elizabeth Behm-Morawitz, Assistant Professor of Communication

In her research, Behm-Morawitz found that female players judged other women after playing a sexualized level of Tomb Raider: Legend.

Video Game Advertisements

From an interview with Elizabeth Behm-Morawitz, Assistant Professor of Communication

Behm-Morawitz also studies video game advertisements that promote certain racial and sexual stereotypes. The graphic art in these ads, she explains, is so advanced that some of her students had trouble identifying whether an animated character was real or not.

Studying Stereotypes in the Media

From an interview with Elizabeth Behm-Morawitz, Assistant Professor of Communication

Behm-Morawitz describes her research into the effects of racial and sexual stereotypes in the media. Her most recent endeavors center around video games, specifically hyper-sexualized characters. “Video gaming is becoming much more mainstream,” she says. “You are seeing the profile of the gamer shift a bit and seeing the gaming industry itself really take off.” This research started for Behm-Morawitz at the University of Arizona, where she had groups of students play sexualized and non-sexualized levels of the video game Tomb Raider: Legend.

Extending Research

From an interview with Elizabeth Behm-Morawitz, Assistant Professor of Communication

Behm-Morawitz recently received a grant to replicate the study she did with Tomb Raider: Legend, this time with additional video games to determine that it is not just one game that can influence players’ perceptions of women. She will also examine stereotypical depictions of African Americans in video games.

Research Leading to More Research

From an interview with Elizabeth Behm-Morawitz, Assistant Professor of Communication

Behm-Morawitz discusses how her investigations into video games and the media may affect other research studies.

Real Life Games

From an interview with Elizabeth Behm-Morawitz, Assistant Professor of Communication

Some games, such as The Sims, are representations of real life, where the player can live in a community or interact with other characters. Players can also personalize their characters to match themselves. Behm-Morawitz will be studying such games associated with “real life” in order to find out how players represent their identities when given multiple options.